Southern Baptists on Boy Scouts and Homosexuals – Misplaced Priorities

Southern Baptists on Boy Scouts and Homosexuals – Misplaced Priorities

I am a social conservative, and I don’t support homosexuality. I probably wouldn’t be too opinionated about homosexual marriage either way if not for the homosexuals who are absolutely militant about their lifestyles and try to sue the crud out of anyone who doesn’t agree with it, or bakers who, due to religious reasons, (Link): don’t want to provide cakes for homosexual marriage ceremonies.

I also realize that militant homosexual groups are very vocal and active in trying to cram their views down the throats of all Americans, which annoys me to no end. I don’t particularly care if people are homosexual, as long as they’d get off their soap boxes about it and stop forcing the matter.

However, many conservative Christians, and certainly the Southern Baptist Convention and series of churches, remains abnormally fixated on all things homosexual (and on other aspects of secular culture), as well as too keen to try to push Christian agendas via politics.

At the recent SBC (Southern Baptist Convention) held in Houston, Texas, here is one consensus they reached:

(Link): Southern Baptists condemn Boy Scouts over admission of gays

Excerpt (by the way, this article incorrectly refers to Southern Baptists as “Protestants”. Southern Baptists are not Protestants):

    The nation’s largest Protestant denomination stopped short of calling for its member churches to boycott the Boy Scouts, but voiced strong opposition to acceptance of gay scouts – with a top church leader predicting at the annual gathering of Southern Baptists that a “mass exodus” of youths from the program that has been a rite of passage for more than a century.

Instead of being preoccupied by those outside the church, Christians are supposed to help fellow Christians first and foremost ((Link): Galatians 6:10), and primarily judge those who are within the body of Christ, not obsessively focus on judging Non Christians in secular culture:

    What business is it of mine to judge those outside the church? Are you not to judge those inside? (1 Cor 5:12)

Southern Baptists and a lot of other Christians claim they are concerned about the inroads homosexuals are making in culture, not just with the BSA (Boy Scouts), but concerning the erosion of “traditional marriage.”

The deterioration of traditional marriage by homosexuals does not really matter all that much, when there is currently a sizable section of Americans, particularly unmarried Christian hetero-sexual women, who desire marriage, but there are no marriage partners (single Christian men of comparable age) for them to marry.

Putting the homosexuals aside for the moment, just consider all the “staight” Christian women who, born in the mid to late 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s who fully expected and looked forward to being married by their late 20s to mid 30s, but still remain single into their late 30s and 40s, and some are in their late 20s now and report having a hard time making it to the altar.

Traditional marriage is already suffering, because hetero, Christian women who want to marry are remaining single against their wishes, because there are not enough Christian single males out there.

It is past time that SBC and other churches in America begin addressing this problem.

I saw on a Christian site where similar topics were being discussed, where a woman (who must be in her 60s, who claims to have been married for over 40s years), balked at another reader’s suggestion that churches help singles get married by doing things such as hosting more social events for older singles, by saying that “church is not a social club.” She is wrong.

Oh yes, yes church most certainly is a “social club.” One reason God created the church is so that Christians could fellowship with each other for the purposes of companionship, emotional and financial support, and to carry the burdens of life with each other.

Church, contrary to what a lot of American Christians assume, was never meant to be only about worshipping God (i.e., singing “praise songs”), spreading the Gospel, and engaging in religious practices, such as reading from the Bible.

Most of the Christians, usually married, (but I’ve seen some singles who feel this way as well – see this page), seem perfectly fine with churches who sponsor “youth rally” type events, or singles Church classes and functions for teens and college-aged singles, such as live rock band shows or pizza parties, but hypocritically, these same individuals take issue with churches offering “pizza parties” (the equivalent to that) for single adults past age 30. Talk about hypocrisy.

Why are these sorts of Christians fine and peachy with churches meeting the needs of un-married persons under the age of 25 – 30, but all the sudden take issue with churches taking practical steps to help singles past the age of 30? Why are those people over the age of 30 any less important than those under 30?

If Christians are serious about re-establishing “traditional marriage,” they will stop focusing on homosexual marriage so much and instead begin assisting un-married hetero- Christian women past the age of 30 who would like to get married but can’t seem to find a Christian Mr. Right anywhere.
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Please see my previous post:

(Link): The Train Wreck that is the Southern Baptist Church

4 thoughts on “Southern Baptists on Boy Scouts and Homosexuals – Misplaced Priorities”

  1. I was talking mostly about from the pulpit, not on blogs, and before all of the recent attention on them and the Boy Scouts. It’s just my opinion. And it may be different from area to area. The SBC may think they’ve been open about sexual ethics, but they have not. It covers a lot more ground than homosexuality and premarital sex.

    I think that condemning an action is not the same as judging a person. But even this wouldn’t be necessary if they had been proactive instead of reactive. If all of a denomination’s beliefs are going to be formed by their reaction to outside events, then their entire church will be built on shaky ground.

    Stereotypes – They’re probably the #1 thing that hold our culture back in the dark ages.

    1. It’s not that I’m against Christians or conservatives critiquing views by other groups, or speaking out against homosexuality, but as times goes by, I am more and more put off by the extreme emphasis they place upon it.

      Every time I visit “The Christian Post” for instance, homosexuality is mentioned in what seems to be about 1/3 of their front page articles. “Christianity Today” is also pretty bad about it. Then the SBs release this “we condemn the BSA over homosexuals” this week.


      You said, “But even this wouldn’t be necessary if they had been proactive instead of reactive.”


      Yep, that’s a big part of my original point. Southern Baptists and other Christians need to spend less time pointing out the specks in other people’s eyes and more concerned with the logs in their own.

      You said,
      “If all of a denomination’s beliefs are going to be formed by their reaction to outside events, then their entire church will be built on shaky ground.”

      I read an article the other day where a Christian journalist interviews average Non Christian Joes, who when asked “Who are Southern Baptists?” the only answers they could give were, “Er, they’re against homosexuals, and they don’t drink beer.”

      Southern Baptists are known for being against lots of things, but NonChr. have no clue what SBs stand in support of. Supposedly, SBs believe in Jesus, but average Joes are unaware.

      I blame the SBs for their image problem. Conservative evangels also just as bad, and the fundies: they spend more time blasting secular culture or sin in general than in just helping people.

  2. “Why are these sorts of Christians fine and peachy with churches meeting the needs of un-married persons under the age of 25 – 30, but all the sudden take issue with churches taking practical steps to help singles past the age of 30? Why are those people over the age of 30 any less important than those under 30?”

    Because most think we’re gay. I tend to think that the SBC’s focus on homosexuality now is a bit to late. If the Baptists had a culture of openness and talked about sexual ethics on an ongoing basis and identified and encouraged virtuous singles in their churches and used them to mentor the youth, they wouldn’t have the crisis they have today with the Boy Scouts and homosexuality. And they could certainly develop programs that would bring never married singles together who wouldn’t otherwise have a chance to meet. Unfortunately, SBC churches have been fixated on pizza parties, penny marches, and praise songs. They can’t recognize the problems facing single Christians with their heads bowed at the golden calf of marriage and “children’s church.”

    1. You said,

      If the Baptists had a culture of openness and talked about sexual ethics on an ongoing basis

      I think they think they already do. A lot of conservative Christians (not just SBs, to be fair) think that chanting on blogs and in sermons, “wait until marriage to have sex,” and “homosexuality is evil” is sufficient for dealing with sexual ethics.

      They expend more energy at pointing out what is wrong with society (complaining about homosexuality) than in actually helping people within the church. If they stopped griping about homosexuals and began putting on more “mix and mingle” events for older singles, there would be more “traditional marriages” created.

      Complaining about homosexuals does nothing to get hetero single Christians married. SBs and other conservative Christians have yet to figure this out.

      I used to wonder why the New Testament (and Christ) told people to spend more time concerned about themselves or the body of believers than in judging those outside the church. It makes more sense to me now.

      You said,

      “Because most think we’re gay.”

      Older women do run into this a little bit, but the stereotype we older single women usually run into is that we are bitter, man-hating feminists who placed love of career over marriage (it is assumed we got tons of male suitors when younger but turned them all down. Incorrect. I had one fiance’ and that was it. I did not have 400,000 males pursuing me, and asking for my hand in marriage.)

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