Special Report: The Gamification of Courtship

Special Report: The Gamification of Courtship

(Link): Special Report: The Gamification of Courtship

Excerpts:

The gamification of courtship has gone global, from viral matchmaker shows in China to Tinder users who don’t stop swiping even after finding love.

The big picture: Apps are the new norm in dating. But the hyper-personalized and endless choices enabled by technology may actually be making it more difficult to meet “the one.”

Gamification is now built into dating:

  • TV series like “The Bachelor,” China’s “If You Are the One” and Britain’s “Love Island” have played off cultural courting traditions to create popular, dramatic and competitive game shows.
  • In apps, the format of swiping can intensify pleasurable chemical reactions in the brain and the “infinite scroll” persuades users to continue swiping into perpetuity.
  • With almost endless options for partners, dating has become about “fast sex, slow love,” Helen Fisher, chief scientific advisor for Match.com told Axios.

Why it matters: Part of playing the game is to make yourself as desirable as possible, which can lead to high, unmet expectations.

  • “We’re showing people this near perfect version of ourselves. It is highly tailored,” Ohio State University’s Jesse Fox told Axios. “You build up your hopes and expectations and then you meet — and it’s awkward.”
  • Many dating app executives who spoke with Axios are wary to call the platforms a game. “People are trying to maximize to find the ideal,” Bumble’s in-house sociologist, Jessica Carbino, suggests, “which is the sort of market nature of love.”
  • “People are able to go on more dates, find more people and, as a result, they’re actually waiting longer to get married than ever before, but they’re also, I think, choosing the best partner for them,” McLeod said.

The bottom line: In 2017, 39% of U.S. heterosexual relationships and 65% of same-sex relationships began online. And apps aren’t going away.

  • For some, “it’s a form of work, not just a game anymore,” says Stephanie Tong of Wayne State University.
  • A cottage industry of services to write profiles, tend to matches and get swipes is popping up. Some, like Relationship Hero, have coaches around the world, available 24/7 to text, call or even video chat through a user’s dating woes.
  • Now, Tong says, it isn’t about projecting confidence face-to-face but about how to write a fancier profile.


Related:

(Link): Online Dating Fatigue is a Real Thing and It’s Happening to Everyone by Madison Vanderberg

(Link):  Stop Telling Your Single Friends to Try Dating Sites – Please.

(Link):   Risky Business: The Dangers of Online Dating and How to Protect Yourself

(Link):  Ingrid Lyne, 40 Year Old, Murdered and Decapitated by Man She Met on Dating Site

(Link): Beware of Rapists on Christian Dating Sites

(Link): Police urge caution when using dating websites / Murderers on Dating Sites

(Link): Woman Meets Man on Dating Site, He Steals Her Dog and TV on First Date

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s