The Next Security Risk May Be Your Vibrator by A. Rizer

The Next Security Risk May Be Your Vibrator by A. Rizer

(Link): The Next Security Risk May Be Your Vibrator

Jun 2017
by Arthur Rizer
Opinion: The internet of things has permitted the hacking of whole new categories of products — including sex toys.

UNTIL HACKERS DISCOVERED the internet of things, a maker of kitchen appliances didn’t have to worry about the security of its toasters. Now, though, the proliferation of networked devices—from televisions to refrigerators to, someday, self-driving cars—has spawned a new form of cyber attack.

This is not only because the points of vulnerability multiply as a network expands, but also because many of the consumer-product manufacturers who now produce networked devices have no experience with digital security.

And few internet-of-things product categories better demonstrate the urgent need to improve security standards than connected sex toys.

In late 2016, a pair of hackers at DefCon, an annual US hacking conference, revealed that one company’s connected vibrator, the We-Vibe, not only tracked sensitive data related to customers’ usage, but also that third parties could access that information. Even more troublingly, hackers were able to take control of the devices remotely.

At RightsCon Brussels 2017, a security researcher showed how another connected vibrator, this one with a built-in camera, could be hacked to allow unauthorized access to the video feed. These breaches highlight just a few of the wide array of connected products with potential vulnerabilities.

…Remember the We-Vibe that was hacked at DefCon? Standard Innovation, the Canadian company that manufactured the device, eventually doled out settlements to its US customers as a result of a class-action lawsuit filed after the 2016 hacking demonstration.

The litigation relied on the DefCon demonstration to prove that the company was collecting information like the temperatures of the devices, as well the intensity of vibration and frequency of use, without users’ consent.

While it was the data collection that led to the settlement, another part of the 2016 DefCon demonstration showed an even darker potential use of the device: Using Bluetooth to connect the We-Vibe to the We-Connect app would allow a user to permit another user to control the device’s settings remotely. This was advertised as a way for partners to “keep their flame ignited— together or apart.”

 That connection, however, also could be hijacked by a stranger or even a stalker to assert control over the device. This is possible by exploiting the connection to the device and monitoring its data.

This type of unwanted conduct begins to resemble sexual assault, and, based on a review of the law in jurisdictions across the US and around the world, may actually qualify as such in several areas. To press such charges, a victim first would need to overcome the threat of stigmatization, identify the attack’s perpetrator, and deal with the inherently thorny question of legal liability.


Related:

(Link): Hackers Could Order Sex Robots To KILL Their Owners, Cyber Security Experts Warn 

(Link):  How to hack a sex toy: tech firms warn public on growing cyber-risks

(Link): Woman Says She Was ‘Virtually Gang-Raped’ in Facebook’s Metaverse

(Link): The Term “Family Values” And Its Use By Christians – Vis A Vis story: Grandma Gives Teen Granddaughter a Vibrator

(Link):  Inconsistent, Disappointing, and Cavalier Attitude Towards Sexism by Some Conservatives – Re: Woman Says A Man Groped Her Avatar in a Simulation

(Link): Disturbing Sites Uses AI to Non-Consensually Digitally Remove Clothing of Clothed People (Usually of Women) to Make Them Appear Nude

(Link): Woman Dies of Flesh-Eating Bacteria After Sex Game Goes Wrong

(Link):  Woman Paralysed after Orgasm During Sex Caused Brain Haemorrhage

(Link): Why Some People Die Soon After Sex by D. Gaze

(Link): Conservative, Church-Going Christian Guy Participates in Threesome, Jumps To Death

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