After 30 Years of Great Sex, My Husband’s New Look is a Total Turn-Off – Advice Column by P. Connolly

After 30 Years of Great Sex, My Husband’s New Look is a Total Turn-Off – Advice Column by P. Connolly 

And so much of secular culture, and goodness knows, complementarian Christians, are obsessed with the notion, which is false, that only “men are visual” or “men are visually stimulated,” when a lot of women are as well.

(Link): After 30 Years of Great Sex, My Husband’s New Look is a Total Turn-Off

He has grown his grey hair long and I don’t find it attractive. Am I being shallow – or is it the menopause?

April 5, 2022

My husband of more than 30 years decided to grow his hair long about three years ago. Sex has always been important to us and I have always felt strongly sexually attracted to him.

But he is 59, with thin, fine grey hair and, as far as I am concerned, this is not a good look. I’m struggling to maintain our previous spark.

Am I just completely shallow and unreasonable to allow a small visual difference get in the way of a previously active and loving intimacy?

Continue reading “After 30 Years of Great Sex, My Husband’s New Look is a Total Turn-Off – Advice Column by P. Connolly”

Sex ‘Highly Important’ to a Quarter of Middle-Aged Women, Study Shows

Sex ‘Highly Important’ to a Quarter of Middle-Aged Women, Study Shows

Christian gender complementarians need to get with the program – first and foremost, toss complementarianism in the trash can where it belongs – but secondly, toss out the sexist, strange, or unbiblical beliefs they have about women’s libidos.

Complementarians enjoy living in a fantasy world where they falsely believe that only men want and enjoy sex, and that women don’t enjoy or want sex. This alleviates them of taking responsibility for pleasing women in the bedroom, I suspect.

(Link): Sex ‘Highly Important’ to a Quarter of Middle-Aged Women, Study Shows

Excerpts:

Sept 2020
by Chris Melore

CLEVELAND, Ohio — There’s a common belief that people lose interest in sex as they age. A new study finds this isn’t exactly true for many middle-aged women.

Researchers say sex still remains important to the daily lives of over 70 percent of women entering midlife.

The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) shows 27 percent of women continue to rate sex as a high priority throughout midlife. The report looks at more than 3,200 participants in the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation.

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Having Less Sex Could Trigger Menopause Earlier Study Says

Having Less Sex Could Trigger Menopause Earlier 2020 Study Says

(Link): Having Less Sex Could Trigger Menopause Earlier 2020 Study Says

Excerpts:

January 2020

Women who have sex at least once per month are less likely to enter early menopause compared to those who have sex less frequently, according to a new study, which followed nearly 3,000 US women for a decade.

The results, which were (Link):  published in Royal Society Open Science, also dispelled previous findings that being married to a male, or being exposed to male pheromones, influenced the timing of menopause, which the authors say is largely linked to genetics.

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Why a Woman’s Sex Life Declines After Menopause (Hint: Sometimes It’s Her Partner) By T. Parker-Pope

Why a Woman’s Sex Life Declines After Menopause (Hint: Sometimes It’s Her Partner) By T. Parker-Pope

(Link): Why a Woman’s Sex Life Declines After Menopause (Hint: Sometimes It’s Her Partner)

Excerpts:

By Tara Parker-Pope
August 2019

A revealing new analysis gives voice to the many reasons a woman’s sex life often falters with age.

For many women, sex after menopause is not as satisfying as it used to be. But is menopause entirely to blame?

New research suggests that the hormonal changes that come with menopause are only part of the reason a woman’s sex life declines with age. It’s true that many women experience symptoms after menopause, including vaginal dryness, painful intercourse and loss of desire — all of which can affect the frequency and pleasure of sex.

But the new study shows that the reasons many women stop wanting sex, enjoying sex and having sex are far more complex.

While women traditionally have been blamed when sex wanes in a relationship, the research shows that, often, it’s the health of a woman’s partner that determines whether she remains sexually active and satisfied with her sex life.

(Most studies have focused entirely on heterosexual women, so less is known about same-sex couples after menopause.)

Continue reading “Why a Woman’s Sex Life Declines After Menopause (Hint: Sometimes It’s Her Partner) By T. Parker-Pope”