Digital Boyfriends Better Than Humans, Gamer Gals Say by Michael Kaplan

Digital Boyfriends Better Than Humans, Gamer Gals Say by Michael Kaplan

I just did a post on here a couple days ago about a guy who says he had a female cockroach as a girlfriend, and he finds roaches more attractive than human women.

(Link): Digital Boyfriends Better Than Humans, Gamer Gals Say

Technology has contributed to making everything from taxi-cabs to bookstores to snail-mail all but outmoded. Joining innovations that include Uber, Amazon and email is a China-based mobile game called “Love and Producer.”

These iconic but artificial men (including a steely CEO, a lovable pop star, a brainy scientist and a super-powered policeman) have the potential to make real-world boyfriends obsolete and so last millennium, (Link): according to Wired.

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Men in China and India Can’t Find Wives Because 71 Million Girls Were Killed in Abortion or Infanticide

Men in China and India Can’t Find Wives Because 71 Million Girls Were Killed in Abortion or Infanticide

Excerpts:

May 2018

The gender imbalance in China and Asia is wreaking social chaos. And the Washington Post’s worldview won’t let it admit the real cause of the problem.

Twenty-one-year-old Li Defu is hard at work, building a house in rural China. While American men his age spend their free time gaming with friends, Li knows he has no time to waste. Without this house, he may never find a wife.

As Li told the Washington Post in a story titled “Too Many Men,” “At the moment there aren’t any girls my age around. I am building this new house in preparation, in case I find someone.”

But even with a nice house to attract a bride, there’s no guarantee that Li will ever find one. The reason: There are 34 million fewer Chinese women than men. Indian men share this demographic nightmare: There are 37 million fewer women than men in India.

What’s the cause of this huge gender imbalance?

Well, reading the Post, you could be forgiven not coming to the obvious conclusion: Seventy million unborn baby girls were aborted—killed in the womb simply because they were female.

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Chinese Company Sells Over 1 Billion Dollars in Stuff on Singles Day

Chinese Company Sells Over 1 Billion Dollars in Stuff on Singles Day

(Link): Singles’ Day Sales In The United States: Ralph Lauren, Barney’s, Missguided, Clarisonic, And More 

(Link): Singles Day: 4 things to know about the world’s biggest shopping promo

Excerpts:

What is Singles Day?
It’s a 24-hour “festival” that starts Friday. Consumers can find deals on 15 million products from 140,000 brands.

Other shopping “holidays” pale in comparison.

According to eMarketer, online spending in the US on Black Friday totaled $2.74 billion last year. Amazon reportedly generated $3 billion in sales during Amazon Prime Day earlier this year.

How did it start?
The holiday originated in China’s Nanjing University in the 1990s when four friends were lamenting the loneliness and monotony of single life.

Someone — it isn’t clear who — then came up with the idea of celebrating single people on Nov. 11.

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TV Show Triggers Chinese Virginity Debate

TV Show Triggers Chinese Virginity Debate

(Link): TV Show Triggers Chinese Virginity Debate by Y. Zhao

“He asked me whether I am a virgin,” says Qiu Yingying, bursting into tears.

She has just found out her relationship with boyfriend Ying Qin is over, after he found out she had had sex in the past.

The scene from China’s biggest soap opera right now, Ode to Joy, has triggered much discussion on whether virginity is still a prized asset for women in modern China.

Ode to Joy, now in its second season, tells the stories of five beautiful women from different walks of life who live in the same floor of an apartment complex in Shanghai.

The show, a less risque version of Sex and the City, is popular among women for its focus on romance, careers, friendships and the difficulties women face in the big city.

‘Out-of-dated topic’

Sex education in China is often poor. There are stories of male biology teachers skipping details of the female reproductive system in class and ask students to learn it by themselves.

And parents very rarely share information about sex with their children.

What almost all parents do, however, is warn their daughters not to have any dates before they graduate from university, fearing that they get hurt or become pregnant.

Chinese communities also traditionally expect chastity before marriage.

That means TV dramas are very influential in shaping audiences’ values. They are windows for young audiences, especially young women, to understand sex and sexuality and the ways views are changing.

Double standards on virginity

Zi Yin, a Shanghai-based film assistant producer, told the BBC that even debating the topic was old-fashioned in the 21st Century. She thought it was “disgusting” for the show to make an issue of it.

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