Lonely George the Tree Snail Dies in 2019 – Researchers Could Not Find Him a Wife

Lonely George the Tree Snail Dies in 2019 – Researchers Could Not Find Him a Wife

Rest in Peace, George the snail.

(I wrote of another single snail previously here: (Link): Love Is Patient: Rare Snail Finally Meets Mate Willing to Accept His Differences )

Here’s the new, sad snail story.

(Link): Lonely George the Tree Snail Dies in 2019 – Researchers Could Not Find Him a Wife

Excerpts:

by C. Wilcox

One famous snail’s death highlights the plight faced by diverse Hawaiian snails, of which there were once hundreds of species.

THE WORLD’S LONELIEST snail is no more.

George, a Hawaiian tree snail—and the last known member of the speciesAchatinella apexfulva—died on New Year’s Day. He was 14, which is quite old for a snail of his kind.

George was born in a captive breeding facility at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa in the early 2000s, and soon after, the rest of his kin died. That’s when he got his name—after Lonesome George, the Pinta Island tortoise who was also the last of his kind.

Continue reading “Lonely George the Tree Snail Dies in 2019 – Researchers Could Not Find Him a Wife”

Love Is Patient: Rare Snail Finally Meets Mate Willing to Accept His Differences by K. Bender

Love Is Patient: Rare Snail Finally Meets Mate Willing to Accept His Differences

I think there may be a lesson in here somewhere for humans.

(Link): Love Is Patient: Rare Snail Finally Meets Mate Willing to Accept His Differences

Excerpts:

by K Bender, Nov 11, 2016

To the human eye, Jeremy doesn’t look that different from most snails, but to other snails he is rather unique.

Due to a genetic mutation, Jeremy’s shell swirls counterclockwise and his sex organs are located on the left side of his head, the opposite arrangement of most snails. According to (Link): NPR, this rare “lefty” look has made it nearly impossible for Jeremy to find a mate, because his sex organs don’t align with those of other snails.

Luckily, Jeremy found a friend in Angus Davison of the University of Nottingham, who is working with a team to find out what gene creates this one in 100,000 anomaly. One of the best ways to do this is to study Jeremy’s offspring. But first the snail has to have offspring, which requires another counterclockwise snail. 

To find a mate for the lovelorn snail, Davison asked the public for help on Twitter, attaching the hashtag #snaillove to his plea.

Continue reading “Love Is Patient: Rare Snail Finally Meets Mate Willing to Accept His Differences by K. Bender”